Thursday, August 06, 2009



Jeremy Clarkson mentions the war



Popularity protects him. He is a breath of fresh air amid Britain's stifling political correctness.
"Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson and Germans go together in much the same way that petrol and naked flames don’t. So when the controversial host announced he had prepared his own spoof ad for the launch of the new Volkswagon Scirocco, the BBC prepared for the worst. And the worst it got - scores of complaints from outraged viewers after Clarkson lauded the VW’s ability to go from “Berlin to Warsaw in one tank”.

More than 6.7 million viewers watched Clarkson’s “ad”, in which panicked Warsaw citizens fled the city, rushing to board buses and trains as sirens warned of the approaching Germans.

The reference to Adolf Hitler’s invasion of Poland that triggered World War II has sparked a storm of debate in the UK and Europe, with onlookers struggling to decide whether Clarkson’s ad was tasteless or just a bit of fun.

Clarkson has made a name for himself as a spokesman of Britain’s un-PC brigade, and it isn’t the first time he’s had fun at the expense of Germany’s wartime atrocities. In 2005, he said a German-made Mini’s indicators should go up and down while mimicking a Nazi salute and that the car should have a GPS system “that only goes to Poland”.

A spokeswoman for the show told Britain’s Daily Mail it had only received a handful of complaints but national broadcast watchdog Ofcom figures are understood to be higher when they are released tomorrow.

The Volkswagon Scirocco episode was the last in the current series. The BBC has confirmed the hugely popular show will return.

Source

"Don't mention the war" is politically correct in Britain but the saying actually comes from an hilarious episode of the famous BBC comedy "Fawlty Towers", featuring the inimitable John Cleese.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think Mr. Clarkson deserves a great deal of credit for not being a subscriber to, nor infected by, the PC virus, that has very clearly spread across Britain. And since there is no sense of rage coming from the people over the "PC'ization" of their country, one can only assume that it's not just the government that's responsible, but the people as well for allowing it to continue.

Bobby said...

What about Hogan's Heroes? What about MASH? War is hell but we cope with humor.

Anonymous said...

There was a time in America where "F*** 'em if they can't take a joke" was a common saying and mentality. Sadly it has mutated into a lot of whiny little pansies saying "he hurt my feelings". Sounds like the Brits are ahead of us in the effort though.

Robert said...

If I gather correctly, there was also a time in America where Red Skelton's "If I dood it, I'd get a whippin'...", a pause of a couple seconds, then "I *DOOD* it!" was a similar mentality. One can see the line uttered by numerous characters in cartoons that came out in the 1940's and 1950's. That, too, seems to have faded into obscurity. Maybe it's time to revive both.

Anonymous said...

Dream on friends. The people of both countries are deeply infected with political correctness, (and it was no accident) and it's not going away. They have surrendered their ability to think for themselves, and rely on others (like the media) to think for them. The result is two countries who's people are weak, mindless, and totally lack the will to resist anything.

Some day, history will record that PC was the weapon that destroyed the freedoms of both our peoples. History might also say that, if the people were that weak, perhaps they didn't deserve to be free.

Anonymous said...

So he never mentions the war, yet he gets attacked for mentioning the war?
Interesting to see how even not mentioning something is now considered by the left to be mentioning that same thing if it might possibly be inferred that you had it in mind.

Thought police indeed.

Anonymous said...

"Some day, history will record that PC was the weapon that destroyed the freedoms of both our peoples. History might also say that, if the people were that weak, perhaps they didn't deserve to be free."

Anon,

Could you translate that into Farsi, Arabic, Urdi, Pashto and dari.

In the not too distant future they will replace the "Queen's English" in the United Kingdom and America.