Friday, December 07, 2012


Cops to Congress: We need logs of Americans’ text messages

"AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Sprint, and other wireless providers would be required to record and store information about Americans' private text messages for at least two years, according to a proposal that police have submitted to the U.S. Congress."

Source

Is America a police state?  On the way to it apparently.  Will there soon be no right to private speech at all?  Various agencies already bug some people so ALL speech is undoubtedly under threat.

11 comments:

Stan B said...

This raises a lot of issues. Since text messages are technically "written," then they would fall under the "papers" clause of the constitution. However, if I destroy papers (delete text messages from my phone) then that is equivalent to destroying records (burning my papers to prevent the authorities from finding them.)

However, most Americans would agree that this requirement would be akin to the government demanding the copying and retention of all mail messages (physical mail). The fact that such messages to through a third party does not give the government the write to regulate their copying.

We may have to go to some sort of encryption and public key exchange on cell phones to secure our text messages. Then the government can demand the carriers keep whatever they want, but it will be irrelevant as the original messages and copies will only exist on the phones themselves in any readable format.

A. Levy said...

One has to be a complete and utter fool to believe we still have any semblance of privacy, be it personal or otherwise. And, thanks to things like facebook, twitter, etc, Americans have given away more of their privacy than the govt. has taken. But don't worry. They're catching up.

Someday soon, the American people are going to realize what their weakness, gullibility, and stupidity have really cost them.

Anonymous said...

I have no problem with keeping logs of such electronic conversations, BUT access should only be granted by consent of the user or by a properly obtained warrant.

Anonymous said...

Did you see that congress "banned" the word lunatic? They actually wasted time to do this while the fiscal cliff looms

Anonymous said...

Quick question and thought exercise (maybe). If the police wants ALL records kept, including our public officials, can't we sue to get their data/files under the Freedom of Informations Act? Remember the old saying about double edges. Just a thought.

Anonymous said...

It seems very strange that neither the sender nor receiver of private written communications are going to be required to keep copies.
Imagine requiring the US Postal Service to scan and keep all letters sent through it.
Seems pointless, expensive and a total invasion of privacy.

Anonymous said...

No comment.

Anonymous said...

Maybe this will save the post office. Since you now have to keep text as will as email for unfittered access, people will realize more privacy with old standby of pin paper would be the best thing, given the need of warrents.

Anonymous said...

There is nothing that can save the Postal Service. Their unions have seen to that. The question then becomes, is it still relevant and worth saving? Most believe it is not.

Dean said...

USPS is still relevant and needed. If they leave, then UPS, FedEx or some similar company will have to take over daily delivery of pen/paper documents, magazines, etc.

If 100% of the population had access to internet it's possible that would be a viable delivery system. But even in my relatively tech savvy circle several have no internet connection, some by choice, some by location.

Personally, I prefer my bills to come on paper. Most of those we receive are backed up on email, but email documents generally don't contain the detail paper documents do.

Anonymous said...

All I can say to this is, Imagine if Bush was president?

Where is the ACLU? Too busy ruining christmas for us all apparently!