Monday, April 29, 2013




Asian-American Frat Under Fire for Blackface Video



The curious convention that whites (and Asians?) must not look like blacks again

The Lambda Theta Delta Fraternity at the University of California, Irvine, has apologized after the release of a YouTube video featuring one of its members in blackface.

The video depicts members of Lambda Theta Delta, an Asian-American fraternity, performing to the Justin Timberlake Song, "Suit and Tie." Members say it was designed to promote an upcoming fraternity event.

Halfway through the clip, one of the members, in an attempt to portray rapper Jay-Z, appears made up in blackface.

"I feel personally offended at that act whether it was for ignorance, whether they just didn't know about it, I feel like that's not an excuse," Ayana Baines, member of UC Irvine's Black Student Union told ABC News affiliate KABC-TV.

Lambda Theta Delta President Darius Obana told KABC-TV the makeup was meant to distinguish one of the performers as Jay-Z. "In a nutshell it was pretty much just to play that role and be Jay-Z and kind of distinguish himself from the other guys in the video," he said.

Source


5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why is it that no one was offended when the he/she/it child molesting freak known as Michael Jackson had treatments to make himself White?

Stefan v said...

Oh the horror of being offended. I get the impression modern people are even offended when refused genuine offenses, and must invent their own. Why? It's all about them. So easy to rule them, that way.

Anonymous said...

offensive - only if belong to the perpetually offended.
People, you are not that important. GET OVER YOURSELF AND GET A LIFE1

Anonymous said...

To anonymous 3:34:

Damn straight. Tolerance and humor are in very short supply these days.

Anonymous said...

Remember, only the self righteous media can mock minorities because of artistic licensing and their self proclaimed supeior freedom of expression intellect. The rest of us commoners do not have intelligence to apprciate th subtle nuance of proper expression and should be willful (and greatful) in their dictation of correct speech. We commonors must remember our place and constantly re-educated of their exhauted mantra: some are more equal than others.