Wednesday, August 02, 2017



Campus Free Speech Laws Ignite the Country

Over the weekend, North Carolina joined a handful of states with laws on the books regarding free speech on college campuses, banning so-called "free speech zones" and requiring campuses to sanction anyone who interferes with the free speech rights of others.

"Every year there seems to be one higher education policy issue that spreads rapidly throughout the states," says Thomas Harnisch, director of state relations and policy analysis at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. "This year it's campus free speech legislation."

The wave of campus free speech legislation comes on the heels of a grueling school year for the First Amendment on campuses across the country. Violent protests largely against conservative speakers highlight the recent struggle colleges and universities are having walking a line between preserving free speech and acting as a space that showcases a variety of ideas, while at the same time protecting students – particularly those in demographic groups who may feel marginalized or threatened by the ideas espoused by a group or speaker.

The Tar Heel State is at least the fifth state – Colorado, Tennessee, Utah and Virginia are the others – with such a law. And other states have legislative proposals in the pipeline, including California, Illinois, Michigan, Texas and Wisconsin.

SOURCE


3 comments:

Paul Weber said...

The Constitution clearly states that things not prohibited by it are reserved to the people. Having to pass laws to clarify our rights gives the impression that we don't have rights unless specifically stated in a law.

Bird of Paradise said...

Free Speech for everyone even if they make pathetic little snowflakes cry and frankly its time for the snowflakes to Grow Up and climb out of their playpen after all every fledgling must leave the nest and the Birds are at least smarter then the snowflakes

Stan B said...

Snowflakes these days need everything spelled out for them these days, and college administrators are such cowards they need a "law" rather than a "principle" to stand behind.